Dealing with Grief Pack

$109.90
Books Beyond Words - Wordless Therapy Storybooks
 
Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories. These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs
 
Am I Going to Die?
This book tells the story of John, who has an intellectual disability. John is dying. The pictures follow him in his illness and his final days. They are designed to help the reader make sense of what is happening to them or someone they know who is ill. The pictures help them to ask questions or share their concerns.
“If you know someone with a learning disability who is very ill, you can use the pictures in this book and the sample storyline to help them understand more about their illness and dying.”
— Down's Syndrome Association Journal, 2009
“Although the story in Am I Going to Die? is fictional, it is based on the real life experiences of ten people with learning disabilities. The book draws on what was important for the participants when they were ill and dying and demonstrates best practice as identified by them.”
— Inside Palliative Care. Volume 8, June 2009
 
When Dad Died
When Dad Died takes a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational. This book and When Mum Died will be helpful to adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities as well as to their carers and supporters. In addition, children without intellectual disabilities will continue to appreciate both books, which adopt a more direct approach to death than usual.
 
When Mum Died
When Mum Died takes a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational.
This book and When Dad Died will be helpful to adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities as well as to their carers and supporters. In addition, children without intellectual disabilities will continue to appreciate both books, which adopt a more direct approach to death than usual.

When Somebody Dies
Everyone feels sad when somebody dies, and people with intellectual disabilities have the same feelings of grief as anyone else. This book tells the story of Mary, who is very upset when someone she loves dies. She is encouraged by a friend to go and see a counsellor. Her counselling sessions help her to feel less sad. Later on in the book, Mary’s friend Frank also loses someone he is close to. He is given comfort and companionship by his friends, and learns to cope with life better as time passes.
 
Sonia's Feeling Sad
Sonia is feeling sad and worried. Her family want to find some help for her and take her to see the doctor. The doctor gives her antidepressant medication. Sonia does not feel better and returns to see the doctor. This time he decides to send her to see a counsellor. After some time to talk about her worries Sonia feels much better.
The story is told in pictures alone to allow for individual interpretation. If you are reading the book with a friend who has a learning disability, try encouraging them to tell the story in their own way. As well as the pictures, a sample storyline is included, with additional background information including organisations that can help.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help.
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting and to answer their questions honestly.
 
 
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Description

Books Beyond Words - Wordless Therapy Storybooks
 
Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories. These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs
 
Am I Going to Die?
This book tells the story of John, who has an intellectual disability. John is dying. The pictures follow him in his illness and his final days. They are designed to help the reader make sense of what is happening to them or someone they know who is ill. The pictures help them to ask questions or share their concerns.
“If you know someone with a learning disability who is very ill, you can use the pictures in this book and the sample storyline to help them understand more about their illness and dying.”
— Down's Syndrome Association Journal, 2009
“Although the story in Am I Going to Die? is fictional, it is based on the real life experiences of ten people with learning disabilities. The book draws on what was important for the participants when they were ill and dying and demonstrates best practice as identified by them.”
— Inside Palliative Care. Volume 8, June 2009
 
When Dad Died
When Dad Died takes a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational. This book and When Mum Died will be helpful to adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities as well as to their carers and supporters. In addition, children without intellectual disabilities will continue to appreciate both books, which adopt a more direct approach to death than usual.
 
When Mum Died
When Mum Died takes a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational.
This book and When Dad Died will be helpful to adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities as well as to their carers and supporters. In addition, children without intellectual disabilities will continue to appreciate both books, which adopt a more direct approach to death than usual.

When Somebody Dies
Everyone feels sad when somebody dies, and people with intellectual disabilities have the same feelings of grief as anyone else. This book tells the story of Mary, who is very upset when someone she loves dies. She is encouraged by a friend to go and see a counsellor. Her counselling sessions help her to feel less sad. Later on in the book, Mary’s friend Frank also loses someone he is close to. He is given comfort and companionship by his friends, and learns to cope with life better as time passes.
 
Sonia's Feeling Sad
Sonia is feeling sad and worried. Her family want to find some help for her and take her to see the doctor. The doctor gives her antidepressant medication. Sonia does not feel better and returns to see the doctor. This time he decides to send her to see a counsellor. After some time to talk about her worries Sonia feels much better.
The story is told in pictures alone to allow for individual interpretation. If you are reading the book with a friend who has a learning disability, try encouraging them to tell the story in their own way. As well as the pictures, a sample storyline is included, with additional background information including organisations that can help.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help.
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting and to answer their questions honestly.
 
 

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SKU: 020718 - 229