Mental Health Pack

$109.90
Books Beyond Words - Wordless Therapy Storybooks
 
Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories. These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs
 
Ann Has Dementia
This is a story told in pictures about Ann, who is diagnosed with dementia. We see her GP and her supporter trying to provide the right care for Ann in the early days of her dementia until she becomes so confused that she has to move into residential care.
If you know someone with an intellectual or learning disability who has dementia, or who has a family member or friend with dementia, you can use the pictures in this book to help them understand what dementia is and how the person with dementia can be supported.
“A story book told in pictures for use with someone with a learning disability who has dementia, or who has a family member or friend with dementia.”
— Living with Dementia, The magazine of Alzheimer's Society, Feb 2013
 
Feeling Cross and Sorting It Out
Ben doesn’t like being rushed and when Paul won’t make time for a chat, Ben gets cross and upset. Ben asks Jane for help and she helps them sort it out. Now Paul understands what is important for Ben and what has been worrying him. The story ends with them choosing a new activity to do together.
We all experience situations that make us feel cross and stressed. Sometimes this can lead to an angry outburst or other sorts of behaviour that challenges. This book will help people and their supporters to work together to sort out difficult situations, and avoid them happening in the future.
“We need to create a bit of a revolution. I would like to see this book distributed widely.”
— Dr Dominic Slowie, National Clinical Director for Learning Disability, NHS England
“This is a beautifully produced book. Congratulations to Beyond Words!”
— Norman Lamb MP, Minister of State for Care and Support
“I’ve enjoyed looking through the pictures in the book... it’s helped me feel a lot calmer.”
— Clive Pressinger, advisor on the book and self-advocate
  
I Can Get Through It
This book tells the story of a woman with intellectual disabilities. She is attacked by a man. We learn what happens to her and how she gets help. Sadly, a lot of people are sexually abused, perhaps as many as 1,500 every year just in the UK. It can happen anywhere – in someone’s home, in a hostel or residential home, at a day centre or a social club, on transport or wherever people with intellectual disabilities are. Typically the abuse is by someone known to the victim, and it is not an isolated incident.
The book shows that it is possible to find help and ‘get through it’. One very worrying fact is that often the person accused of hurting the man or woman with intellectual disabilities is not made to appear in court. This may be because the police and the lawyers do not think they can find enough evidence or they do not think that the person with intellectual disabilities would be able to appear in court and be a good witness. There are lots of improvements that need to be made to help people with intellectual disabilities look after themselves and know what to do. Psychotherapy is one of the things which has been shown to help people who have been abused.
“From its title onward, I Can Get Through It is a client-centered resource of power and courage.”
— British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 2000
 
Ron's Feeling Blue
This book shows what happens to Ron when he loses interest in doing things because he is depressed. It also shows how he is helped to feel better. Like many other people he is offered counselling. An alternative storyline shows him taking antidepressant medication. Lots of people’s stories will fit this book. It will help if you or someone you know gets
depressed.
The story is told in pictures alone to allow for individual interpretation. If you are reading the book with a friend who has an intellectual disability, try encouraging them to tell the story in their own way. As well as the pictures, a sample storyline is included, with additional background information including organisations that can help.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help.
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting and to answer their questions honestly.
 
Sonia's Feeling Sad
Sonia is feeling sad and worried. Her family want to find some help for her and take her to see the doctor. The doctor gives her antidepressant medication. Sonia does not feel better and returns to see the doctor. This time he decides to send her to see a counsellor. After some time to talk about her worries Sonia feels much better.
The story is told in pictures alone to allow for individual interpretation. If you are reading the book with a friend who has a learning disability, try encouraging them to tell the story in their own way. As well as the pictures, a sample storyline is included, with additional background information including organisations that can help.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help.
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting and to answer their questions honestly.
 
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Books Beyond Words - Wordless Therapy Storybooks
 
Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories. These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs
 
Ann Has Dementia
This is a story told in pictures about Ann, who is diagnosed with dementia. We see her GP and her supporter trying to provide the right care for Ann in the early days of her dementia until she becomes so confused that she has to move into residential care.
If you know someone with an intellectual or learning disability who has dementia, or who has a family member or friend with dementia, you can use the pictures in this book to help them understand what dementia is and how the person with dementia can be supported.
“A story book told in pictures for use with someone with a learning disability who has dementia, or who has a family member or friend with dementia.”
— Living with Dementia, The magazine of Alzheimer's Society, Feb 2013
 
Feeling Cross and Sorting It Out
Ben doesn’t like being rushed and when Paul won’t make time for a chat, Ben gets cross and upset. Ben asks Jane for help and she helps them sort it out. Now Paul understands what is important for Ben and what has been worrying him. The story ends with them choosing a new activity to do together.
We all experience situations that make us feel cross and stressed. Sometimes this can lead to an angry outburst or other sorts of behaviour that challenges. This book will help people and their supporters to work together to sort out difficult situations, and avoid them happening in the future.
“We need to create a bit of a revolution. I would like to see this book distributed widely.”
— Dr Dominic Slowie, National Clinical Director for Learning Disability, NHS England
“This is a beautifully produced book. Congratulations to Beyond Words!”
— Norman Lamb MP, Minister of State for Care and Support
“I’ve enjoyed looking through the pictures in the book... it’s helped me feel a lot calmer.”
— Clive Pressinger, advisor on the book and self-advocate
  
I Can Get Through It
This book tells the story of a woman with intellectual disabilities. She is attacked by a man. We learn what happens to her and how she gets help. Sadly, a lot of people are sexually abused, perhaps as many as 1,500 every year just in the UK. It can happen anywhere – in someone’s home, in a hostel or residential home, at a day centre or a social club, on transport or wherever people with intellectual disabilities are. Typically the abuse is by someone known to the victim, and it is not an isolated incident.
The book shows that it is possible to find help and ‘get through it’. One very worrying fact is that often the person accused of hurting the man or woman with intellectual disabilities is not made to appear in court. This may be because the police and the lawyers do not think they can find enough evidence or they do not think that the person with intellectual disabilities would be able to appear in court and be a good witness. There are lots of improvements that need to be made to help people with intellectual disabilities look after themselves and know what to do. Psychotherapy is one of the things which has been shown to help people who have been abused.
“From its title onward, I Can Get Through It is a client-centered resource of power and courage.”
— British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 2000
 
Ron's Feeling Blue
This book shows what happens to Ron when he loses interest in doing things because he is depressed. It also shows how he is helped to feel better. Like many other people he is offered counselling. An alternative storyline shows him taking antidepressant medication. Lots of people’s stories will fit this book. It will help if you or someone you know gets
depressed.
The story is told in pictures alone to allow for individual interpretation. If you are reading the book with a friend who has an intellectual disability, try encouraging them to tell the story in their own way. As well as the pictures, a sample storyline is included, with additional background information including organisations that can help.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help.
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting and to answer their questions honestly.
 
Sonia's Feeling Sad
Sonia is feeling sad and worried. Her family want to find some help for her and take her to see the doctor. The doctor gives her antidepressant medication. Sonia does not feel better and returns to see the doctor. This time he decides to send her to see a counsellor. After some time to talk about her worries Sonia feels much better.
The story is told in pictures alone to allow for individual interpretation. If you are reading the book with a friend who has a learning disability, try encouraging them to tell the story in their own way. As well as the pictures, a sample storyline is included, with additional background information including organisations that can help.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help.
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting and to answer their questions honestly.
 

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SKU: 040718 - 229