Books Beyond Words

Getting on with Type 1 Diabetes

$28.95 inc GST $26.32 ex GST

Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories.
These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs
If you know a child or young person with an intellectual disability who has type 1 diabetes, you can use the pictures in this book to help them understand what diabetes is and how, with support, this illness can fit into their everyday life.
Florence is always thirsty and lacks energy. She is referred to hospital and has lots of tests. She is told she has diabetes and learns how to inject insulin and eat a healthy diet. At the end of the story, we see Florence enjoying time with her school friends again.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you
• Some will use the pictures to tell their own story
• Some will not be able to follow the story, but may be able to understand some of the pictures.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at, or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting. As well as the pictures, a sample story-line is included, together with information about diabetes and where to find help and advice.
SKU: 150618 - 229 Categories: , Ages: 0-5 Author: Sheila Hollins & Rachel Besser Illustrator: Publisher: Books Beyond Words Page count: 50 Edition: ISBN: 9781874439158 Publish date: Language: English

Product overview

Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories.
These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs
If you know a child or young person with an intellectual disability who has type 1 diabetes, you can use the pictures in this book to help them understand what diabetes is and how, with support, this illness can fit into their everyday life.
Florence is always thirsty and lacks energy. She is referred to hospital and has lots of tests. She is told she has diabetes and learns how to inject insulin and eat a healthy diet. At the end of the story, we see Florence enjoying time with her school friends again.
• Some people will be able to follow the story without any help
• Most people will be able to follow the story with some help from you
• Some will use the pictures to tell their own story
• Some will not be able to follow the story, but may be able to understand some of the pictures.
You may want to give the person the whole book to look at, or you could choose just a few pictures that you think will be particularly relevant. The book will give you the opportunity to provide as much support and reassurance as is needed by the person you are supporting. As well as the pictures, a sample story-line is included, together with information about diabetes and where to find help and advice.