Talking About Abuse and Trauma Pack

$108.77
Books Beyond Words - Wordless Therapy Storybooks
 
Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories. These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
 
Bob Tells All
Bob has moved to a group home, but his erratic behaviour and terrifying nightmares unsettle the other people living there. Sensitively, a social worker helps Bob unravel his painful past as a victim of sexual abuse. Bob discovers that talking with people he can trust begins a slow, but positive, healing process.
The authors are both mental health professionals: a psychiatrist and a psychotherapist. The artist is a psychology and sociology graduate who has specialised in colour and mime as alternative communication media.
 
Finding a Safe Place from Abuse
Katie meets David and falls in love. She moves in with him, but the relationship turns difficult and dangerous when David begins to steal her money and hurt her. Katie quickly gets help through her GP. After a stay in a refuge, Katie begins a new life with a new sense of confidence.
Domestic abuse affects millions of people in the UK, causing profound emotional and physical harm. Support to stop the abuse and deal with its effects is vital. This book will help people of all ages and abilities to recognise some of the different types of abuse that can happen in relationships, how to seek help, and how a safe and rewarding life can
follow after abuse.
“These books are there to help tell a story and put that story into pictures so that everybody can understand. I think that is why so wonderful that the series is called ‘Beyond Words’ because what people experience, what people suffer, in domestic violence is quite often beyond words.”
— The Rt Hon. Baroness Scotland of Asthal QC (EDV Global Foundation / co-author)
“An enormous amount of people who we see at Respond, as well as having survived abuse within their families, go on to make intimate relationships themselves, which are also violent. It is very hard for them to speak of this because often it is such an amazing thing for someone with a learning disability to be in a relationship, which can be quite a challenge sometimes in itself, that the last thing you want to do is to tell someone that it’s not working out too well. And they may not always recognise that relationships should not be as bad as the one they are in. So these books will help people to conceptualise that, and let us know, and to tell their own story through the pictures.”
— Noelle Blackman (CEO Respond / co-author)
“It was a privilege to go and get involved with the book and for other people to hear my voice so that they could get help. I am so happy that the book is ready and it is amazing how it has come out and that people now have copies.”
— Jenny Cashman (Beverley Lewis House, Advisor)
 
I Can Get Through It
This book tells the story of a woman with intellectual disabilities. She is attacked by a man. We learn what happens to her and how she gets help. Sadly, a lot of people are sexually abused, perhaps as many as 1,500 every year just in the UK. It can happen anywhere – in someone’s home, in a hostel or residential home, at a day centre or a social club, on transport or wherever people with intellectual disabilities are. Typically the abuse is by someone known to the victim, and it is not an isolated incident.
The book shows that it is possible to find help and ‘get through it’. One very worrying fact is that often the person accused of hurting the man or woman with intellectual disabilities is not made to appear in court. This may be because the police and the lawyers do not think they can find enough evidence or they do not think that the person with intellectual disabilities would be able to appear in court and be a good witness. There are lots of improvements that need to be made to help people with intellectual disabilities look after themselves and know what to do. Psychotherapy is one of the things which has been shown to help people who have been abused.
“From its title onward, I Can Get Through It is a client-centered resource of power and courage.”
— British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 2000
 
Jenny Speaks Out
Jenny has moved to a group home, but she is very unhappy and unsettled. Sensitively, her carer helps Jenny to feel secure enough to talk about why she is upset. Jenny discloses that she was sexually abused by her father. The story shows how the warmth and trust of her carer and friends begin a healing process which will bring hope and a fresh start for Jenny. Jenny Speaks Out may enable a person with intellectual disabilities or mental health problems to open up about their experience of sexual abuse.
The authors are both mental health professionals: a psychiatrist and a psychotherapist. The artist is a psychology and sociology graduate who has specialised in colour and mime as alternative communication media.
 
When Dad Hurts Mum
After her dad is violent towards her mum, Katie is sad and distracted at college. Her teacher supports the family to get the help of an Independent Domestic Violence Advocate and the police. Katie and her mum are kept safe. Katie’s dad is court-ordered to join a group to stop his abusive behaviour.
Growing up in a family where there is domestic abuse can leave a young person with painful and overwhelming feelings. It can have a considerable impact on how they grow up and form their own relationships. Sometimes this leads to repeated patterns of abuse in later life. This book will help young people and adults with intellectual or communication difficulties to learn about domestic abuse and how to get help. It will also help people to deal with their own experiences of an abusive home.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs
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Books Beyond Words - Wordless Therapy Storybooks
 
Thinking in pictures
 
People who can’t read or who don’t like written words are often very good at reading pictures. That’s why there are no words in these picture stories. These books all tell a story, but they also let the reader tell their own story – the one they see in the pictures. This can tell you a lot about a person’s inner world and their understanding of situations. There is plenty to talk about and each story explores feelings and relationships as well as giving information.
 
 
Bob Tells All
Bob has moved to a group home, but his erratic behaviour and terrifying nightmares unsettle the other people living there. Sensitively, a social worker helps Bob unravel his painful past as a victim of sexual abuse. Bob discovers that talking with people he can trust begins a slow, but positive, healing process.
The authors are both mental health professionals: a psychiatrist and a psychotherapist. The artist is a psychology and sociology graduate who has specialised in colour and mime as alternative communication media.
 
Finding a Safe Place from Abuse
Katie meets David and falls in love. She moves in with him, but the relationship turns difficult and dangerous when David begins to steal her money and hurt her. Katie quickly gets help through her GP. After a stay in a refuge, Katie begins a new life with a new sense of confidence.
Domestic abuse affects millions of people in the UK, causing profound emotional and physical harm. Support to stop the abuse and deal with its effects is vital. This book will help people of all ages and abilities to recognise some of the different types of abuse that can happen in relationships, how to seek help, and how a safe and rewarding life can
follow after abuse.
“These books are there to help tell a story and put that story into pictures so that everybody can understand. I think that is why so wonderful that the series is called ‘Beyond Words’ because what people experience, what people suffer, in domestic violence is quite often beyond words.”
— The Rt Hon. Baroness Scotland of Asthal QC (EDV Global Foundation / co-author)
“An enormous amount of people who we see at Respond, as well as having survived abuse within their families, go on to make intimate relationships themselves, which are also violent. It is very hard for them to speak of this because often it is such an amazing thing for someone with a learning disability to be in a relationship, which can be quite a challenge sometimes in itself, that the last thing you want to do is to tell someone that it’s not working out too well. And they may not always recognise that relationships should not be as bad as the one they are in. So these books will help people to conceptualise that, and let us know, and to tell their own story through the pictures.”
— Noelle Blackman (CEO Respond / co-author)
“It was a privilege to go and get involved with the book and for other people to hear my voice so that they could get help. I am so happy that the book is ready and it is amazing how it has come out and that people now have copies.”
— Jenny Cashman (Beverley Lewis House, Advisor)
 
I Can Get Through It
This book tells the story of a woman with intellectual disabilities. She is attacked by a man. We learn what happens to her and how she gets help. Sadly, a lot of people are sexually abused, perhaps as many as 1,500 every year just in the UK. It can happen anywhere – in someone’s home, in a hostel or residential home, at a day centre or a social club, on transport or wherever people with intellectual disabilities are. Typically the abuse is by someone known to the victim, and it is not an isolated incident.
The book shows that it is possible to find help and ‘get through it’. One very worrying fact is that often the person accused of hurting the man or woman with intellectual disabilities is not made to appear in court. This may be because the police and the lawyers do not think they can find enough evidence or they do not think that the person with intellectual disabilities would be able to appear in court and be a good witness. There are lots of improvements that need to be made to help people with intellectual disabilities look after themselves and know what to do. Psychotherapy is one of the things which has been shown to help people who have been abused.
“From its title onward, I Can Get Through It is a client-centered resource of power and courage.”
— British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 2000
 
Jenny Speaks Out
Jenny has moved to a group home, but she is very unhappy and unsettled. Sensitively, her carer helps Jenny to feel secure enough to talk about why she is upset. Jenny discloses that she was sexually abused by her father. The story shows how the warmth and trust of her carer and friends begin a healing process which will bring hope and a fresh start for Jenny. Jenny Speaks Out may enable a person with intellectual disabilities or mental health problems to open up about their experience of sexual abuse.
The authors are both mental health professionals: a psychiatrist and a psychotherapist. The artist is a psychology and sociology graduate who has specialised in colour and mime as alternative communication media.
 
When Dad Hurts Mum
After her dad is violent towards her mum, Katie is sad and distracted at college. Her teacher supports the family to get the help of an Independent Domestic Violence Advocate and the police. Katie and her mum are kept safe. Katie’s dad is court-ordered to join a group to stop his abusive behaviour.
Growing up in a family where there is domestic abuse can leave a young person with painful and overwhelming feelings. It can have a considerable impact on how they grow up and form their own relationships. Sometimes this leads to repeated patterns of abuse in later life. This book will help young people and adults with intellectual or communication difficulties to learn about domestic abuse and how to get help. It will also help people to deal with their own experiences of an abusive home.
 
Age: Teens and Special Needs

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SKU: 010718 - 229