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Insights into Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse Pack

$334.95 inc GST $304.50 ex GST

Despite changes to laws and policies across most western democracies intended to combat abusive relationships, intimate partner violence and abuse (IPVA) remains discouragingly commonplace. The reality is that domestic violence occurs in families of all races, cultures, and socio-economic levels. Recognising early warning signs is critical in the reduction of domestic violence. Part of the problem is that domestic violence encompasses many different types of abuse including physical, sexual, psychological, emotional or verbal, financial, and/or any combination.

The resources in this pack examine the challenges and opportunities for professionals working in the field and includes an analysis of an evidence informed perpetrator programme, the challenges faced working with male victims, a discussion of the impact of domestic violence on children, and theoretical frameworks for examining the context, intentions and experiences in the lives of people who experience abuse and abuse themselves.

The Insights into Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse Pack includes:

Innovations in Interventions to Address Intimate Partner Violence – speaks to what can be done to effectively intervene to end intimate partner violence against women. Including contributions from both researchers and practitioners, chapters describe service innovations across systems in large urban and remote rural contexts, aimed at majority and minority populations, and that utilise a range of theoretical perspectives to understand and promote change in violence and victimisation

Intimate Partner Violence – provides a critical analysis of the issue of domestic violence including issues that are often not part of the mainstream discussion. Each of the chapters tackles a different area of research or practice, from a critical review of contemporary topics in domestic violence research, including a critical review of men’s use of violence in relationships, a consideration of male victims, IPV within the LGBTQ+ community, perceptions of perpetrators and victims, and IPV within adolescent populations.

Domestic Violence and Psychology – showcases women’s harrowing stories of living with and leaving violent partners, offering a psychological perspective on domestic violence and developing a theoretical framework for examining the context, intentions and experiences in the lives of people who experience abuse and abuse themselves.

Domestic and Family Violence – provides a firm theoretical and empirical overview of core issues, covering the challenges and support needs experienced by those affected, along with the implications this raises for the range of relevant response services. Also offers insight into the predominantly gendered nature of DFV and its influence beyond the traditional couple context, across age, gender, sexual orientation, cultural background and family relationships.

The Domestic Violence Survival Workbook – combines two powerful psychological tools: self-assessment and journaling. The five sections of the workbook help participants learn skills for recognising and effectively dealing with abusive relationships, utilising the domestic violence worksheets.

SKU: 221118 - 123 Categories: , , , Ages: Adult Language: English

Product overview

Despite changes to laws and policies across most western democracies intended to combat abusive relationships, intimate partner violence and abuse (IPVA) remains discouragingly commonplace. The reality is that domestic violence occurs in families of all races, cultures, and socio-economic levels. Recognising early warning signs is critical in the reduction of domestic violence. Part of the problem is that domestic violence encompasses many different types of abuse including physical, sexual, psychological, emotional or verbal, financial, and/or any combination.

The resources in this pack examine the challenges and opportunities for professionals working in the field and includes an analysis of an evidence informed perpetrator programme, the challenges faced working with male victims, a discussion of the impact of domestic violence on children, and theoretical frameworks for examining the context, intentions and experiences in the lives of people who experience abuse and abuse themselves.

The Insights into Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse Pack includes:

Innovations in Interventions to Address Intimate Partner Violence – speaks to what can be done to effectively intervene to end intimate partner violence against women. Including contributions from both researchers and practitioners, chapters describe service innovations across systems in large urban and remote rural contexts, aimed at majority and minority populations, and that utilise a range of theoretical perspectives to understand and promote change in violence and victimisation

Intimate Partner Violence – provides a critical analysis of the issue of domestic violence including issues that are often not part of the mainstream discussion. Each of the chapters tackles a different area of research or practice, from a critical review of contemporary topics in domestic violence research, including a critical review of men’s use of violence in relationships, a consideration of male victims, IPV within the LGBTQ+ community, perceptions of perpetrators and victims, and IPV within adolescent populations.

Domestic Violence and Psychology – showcases women’s harrowing stories of living with and leaving violent partners, offering a psychological perspective on domestic violence and developing a theoretical framework for examining the context, intentions and experiences in the lives of people who experience abuse and abuse themselves.

Domestic and Family Violence – provides a firm theoretical and empirical overview of core issues, covering the challenges and support needs experienced by those affected, along with the implications this raises for the range of relevant response services. Also offers insight into the predominantly gendered nature of DFV and its influence beyond the traditional couple context, across age, gender, sexual orientation, cultural background and family relationships.

The Domestic Violence Survival Workbook – combines two powerful psychological tools: self-assessment and journaling. The five sections of the workbook help participants learn skills for recognising and effectively dealing with abusive relationships, utilising the domestic violence worksheets.