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Social Skills

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Social Skills Developing Effective Interpersonal Communication, 1st Edition

What can we do to help those who struggle to develop effective social skills?

Social Skills: Developing Effective Interpersonal Communication is a definitive guide to understanding and meeting the needs of those who have difficulty with social skills. Written in a clear and accessible manner, this book provides a theoretical framework to the teaching of social skills alongside a range of practical ideas for practitioners.
The book offers a four-step plan that can be adapted for use with young people or adults who are struggling with any aspect of their social skills. A simple model for assessing social skills is provided, as well as ways to measure the impact of intervention. Full of interesting examples and case studies, it includes discussion of how to teach social skills, how social skills develop through childhood, why they sometimes might not, and why social skills difficulties can have an impact on self-esteem and friendships.

It includes a breakdown of social skills into the following areas:
• body language
• eye contact
• listening and paralanguage
• starting and ending conversations
• maintaining conversations
• assertiveness

Written by one of the most well-known speech and language therapists in this field and the creator of the internationally successful Talkabout resources, this book provides a key reference for the study of social skills. It will be essential reading for educators, therapists, parents and anyone supporting others in developing communication and social skills.

 
What are the seven key components of social skills?
 
Alex Kelly, speech and language therapist and author of the bestselling ‘Talkabout’ resources for developing interpersonal skills in children, explains the different behaviours we use to interact with each other.
 
A socially skilled person communicates with others using their learned nonverbal & verbal behaviours in a way that is appropriate to the situation and listener, and that is effective, in that it has the desired outcome. Nonverbal behaviour can include body language, eye contact, facial expressions and posture – in addition to paralinguistic skills such as volume, intonation and fluency of speech. Verbal skills, such as conversational skills, are interrelated with nonverbal skills, and each can impact on the effectiveness of each one, and how we use them.
 
Importantly, social skills are learned through a variety of ways – imitation, feedback, through parents, peers, and teachers – and the feedback we receive shapes our development of these skills. As these are learned behaviours, it means we can also teach them later on in life.
 
Part of being socially skilled means we alter our behaviour as appropriate to the situation or audience. We learn, but can change and adapt, and we can build an awareness of when and how to use our skills. We can react to how another person is responding, looking at them and inferring what they might be thinking and feeling so we can alter out behaviour accordingly. Saying the right thing at the wrong time is just as socially unskilled as saying the wrong thing in the first place.
SKU: 270119 - 66 Categories: , Ages: 13-18

Product overview

Social Skills Developing Effective Interpersonal Communication, 1st Edition

What can we do to help those who struggle to develop effective social skills?

Social Skills: Developing Effective Interpersonal Communication is a definitive guide to understanding and meeting the needs of those who have difficulty with social skills. Written in a clear and accessible manner, this book provides a theoretical framework to the teaching of social skills alongside a range of practical ideas for practitioners.
The book offers a four-step plan that can be adapted for use with young people or adults who are struggling with any aspect of their social skills. A simple model for assessing social skills is provided, as well as ways to measure the impact of intervention. Full of interesting examples and case studies, it includes discussion of how to teach social skills, how social skills develop through childhood, why they sometimes might not, and why social skills difficulties can have an impact on self-esteem and friendships.

It includes a breakdown of social skills into the following areas:
• body language
• eye contact
• listening and paralanguage
• starting and ending conversations
• maintaining conversations
• assertiveness

Written by one of the most well-known speech and language therapists in this field and the creator of the internationally successful Talkabout resources, this book provides a key reference for the study of social skills. It will be essential reading for educators, therapists, parents and anyone supporting others in developing communication and social skills.

 
What are the seven key components of social skills?
 
Alex Kelly, speech and language therapist and author of the bestselling ‘Talkabout’ resources for developing interpersonal skills in children, explains the different behaviours we use to interact with each other.
 
A socially skilled person communicates with others using their learned nonverbal & verbal behaviours in a way that is appropriate to the situation and listener, and that is effective, in that it has the desired outcome. Nonverbal behaviour can include body language, eye contact, facial expressions and posture – in addition to paralinguistic skills such as volume, intonation and fluency of speech. Verbal skills, such as conversational skills, are interrelated with nonverbal skills, and each can impact on the effectiveness of each one, and how we use them.
 
Importantly, social skills are learned through a variety of ways – imitation, feedback, through parents, peers, and teachers – and the feedback we receive shapes our development of these skills. As these are learned behaviours, it means we can also teach them later on in life.
 
Part of being socially skilled means we alter our behaviour as appropriate to the situation or audience. We learn, but can change and adapt, and we can build an awareness of when and how to use our skills. We can react to how another person is responding, looking at them and inferring what they might be thinking and feeling so we can alter out behaviour accordingly. Saying the right thing at the wrong time is just as socially unskilled as saying the wrong thing in the first place.